Patient Care

Bronchiectasis- Overview

Bronchiectasis is a congenital or acquired disorder of the bronchi in the lungs, characterized by abnormal dilation and destruction of the bronchial walls. Most commonly, people suffer from an acquired form and a large number of diseases can lead to bronchiectasis.

In adults, the dilation of the bronchi is not reversible. However, with appropriate treatment the disease may not progress. Most people with bronchiectasis can live a normal life. It is best to detected bronchiectasis at the earliest stage possible to prevent deterioration of the lung disease.

In the USA an estimated 110 000 individuals suffer from bronchiectasis. Since the control of many infections with antibiotics, the age of onset of bronchiectasis has moved into adulthood (except in Cystic Fibrosis).
The University of Miami has a dedicated bronchiectasis/nontuberculous mycobacterial clinic with a research focus on the treatment of these diseases.

Dr. Matthias Salathe and Dr. Andreas Schmid specialize in treating patients with bronchiectasis. They see patients in Miami and, on
a monthly basis, at the UM Satellite clinic in Boca Raton.

The University of Miami Health System offers several ways to request an appointment with these physicians. You can make an appointment by calling Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Eastern Time at 305-243-4000 or toll-free 1-800-432-0191. Appointments can also be requested online at: https://uhealthsystem.com/appointment

For patients with bronchiectasis interested in participation of clinical studies, please follow the link to the division’s research page Pulmonary Research for further contact information.

Links

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/brn/

http://www.niaid.nih.gov/LabsAndResources/labs/aboutlabs/lcid/immunopathSec/Pages/bronchiectasisRegistry.aspx

http://www.lung.org/lung-disease/bronchiectasis/

http://www.copdfoundation.org/Research/Bronchiectasis-Research-Registry/Learn-More.aspx

http://www.cscc.unc.edu/bron/

http://patients.thoracic.org/?page_id=283